Monday Monday – The Mamas and Papas

THIS DAY IN MUSIC………………………………..on May 8th of 1966 The Mamas And Papas occupy the #1 spot in the US with “Monday, Monday”. While awaiting the release of “California Dreamin’,” band member Denny Doherty was prodding songwriter John Phillips to come up with some new material. Phillips said he would come back in the morning with “A song with universal appeal.” Ignoring the sarcastic comments from the group members, Phillips came up with this. It’s about the lousy feeling that comes with the end of the weekend and beginning of another workweek. Denny Doherty, who sang lead on this song for The Mamas & the Papas thought very little of “Monday Monday” when they recorded it. “Nobody likes Monday, so I thought it was just a song about the working man,” he said. “Nothing about it stood out to me; it was a dumb f–kin’ song about a day of the week.” Doherty wasn’t alone in his incredulity: Mama Cass and Michelle Phillips didn’t like the song either, and John Phillips claimed he had no idea what the song meant. As you can imagine, they were taken by surprise when the song became a huge hit. The Mamas & the Papas used top-tier Los Angeles studio musicians on their recordings. On this track, Larry Knechtel played keyboards, Joe Osborn played bass, Hal Blaine was on drums and P.F. Sloan played guitar. Sloan was the baby of the bunch, just 20 years old when the song was released.”Monday, Monday” was the group’s third single. “Go Where You Wanna Go” was issued first and went nowhere, but their next release was “California Dreamin’,” which was a phenomenon. When that song was having its run, radio stations started playing “Monday, Monday” off the album, so by the time it was released as a single, it was already widely anticipated and quickly rose to #1. This was the first Hot 100 chart-topper with a day in the week in the title, and the only one with “Monday.” (“Manic Monday” by the Bangles and “Rainy Days And Mondays” by the Carpenters both stalled at #2.) The record made #3 in the UK. On March 2nd, 1967, the effort would bring them a Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.